Log Date

I'm not a control freak. I just think you should think like me.

  1. Link post

    There’s a reason I love me some Henry Aaron, and it’s not just those great tasting candy bars. Read his take on politics and the Obama presidency. This from a man who dealt with death threats if he ever had the nerve to surpass Babe Ruth’s home run record. Well, he not only had the nerve, and the power, to break the Babe, but he did so without performance enhancing drugs. Oh, Henry!!

  2. Photo post

    The great Melissa Harris-Perry is back! Forget the back-to-back palefaced male political bloviators; check out ACTUAL CONVERSATIONS with men, women, kids, and foot soldiers weighing in on what’s happening in this country and the world. Her show is an absolute treasure. Get your Nerdland on!

"Melissa Harris-Perry" Saturdays & Sundays 10AM-noon on MSNBC.

    The great Melissa Harris-Perry is back! Forget the back-to-back palefaced male political bloviators; check out ACTUAL CONVERSATIONS with men, women, kids, and foot soldiers weighing in on what’s happening in this country and the world. Her show is an absolute treasure. Get your Nerdland on!

    "Melissa Harris-Perry" Saturdays & Sundays 10AM-noon on MSNBC.

    Notes: 2 notes

  3. Link post

    This may be the show-biz equivalent of Edward R. Murrow’s famous “See It Now” episode that consisted of Senator Joe McCarthy talking. And talking. And talking. Yadda yadda yadda Communist infiltration and “are you now or have you ever been” crapola. His own words showed the country that he was a bully and a lunatic, and that was that. Her own quotes plus her ridiculous comments about how hard moviemaking is (with a nanny, assistants, publicist, trainer, chef, taster, makeup artist, spiritual advisor, Goop content team, hairstylist, colorist) tell the story. And by the way - I met Blythe Danner once and she was as kind as she is classy. And she shows more acting chops in a television commercial for post-menopausal osteoporosis than Gwyneth ever has.

  4. Link post

    As we approach tax season, and are forced to take a good, long look at our finances, here are a few thoughts on saving, spending, having, and not having. Dough.

  5. Text post

    ON BEING AN UNFINISHED MENACE

    I’m not finished with this piece by a long shot! Thought it was saved as a draft but it published. Whoops. Appreciate any and all feedback; am taking this down until the thing is done.

    So… y’all come back now, y’hear?

    Thanks.
    Nance

    Notes: 1 note

  6. Photo post

    This, as I walked out of my door yesterday. From the two sweetest kids in my neighborhood.  Please don’t rain —ever!

    This, as I walked out of my door yesterday. From the two sweetest kids in my neighborhood. Please don’t rain —ever!

    Notes: 5 notes

  7. Link post

    A lovely review from nyctheatre.com last month about my show last month that I should have posted sometime last month..but what the heck. For all who missed the show — it was even BETTER than this review!

  8. Link post

    A cool article! And big thanks to Mara Rose Williams, who was a hoot to talk to.

  9. Chat post

    I Thought I Already Posted These

    1. If I did, er..SORRY! I'm almost ready to chuck every Mac device I have out of the window because they're not agreeing with each other.
    2. These are older posts from the last few years, but I have new stuff to post. It's around here, someplace.
    3. Happy Black History half-month-left!

    Notes: 1 note

  10. Text post

    And here’s your host….DON CORNELIUS!

    I was ten when “Soul Train” first hit the small screen, and there had never been anything like it on television.  Yes, there was “American Bandstand,” but this was so much cooler, with black kids of all shades and sizes, and more Afros per square inch before, or since.  It was like a televised dance party with a bunch of my friends.  That is, if the party had brighter lights, and my friends happened to be the “Soul Train” dancers, with stylish clothes.  And forget the records; the recording artists were right there.  Lip-syncing, sometimes (which was kind of lame), but lots of times they sang live, and you’d groove to Kool And The Gang,  Gladys Knight and the Pips, The Jackson 5,  Al Green, Barry White (with the entire Love Unlimited Orchestra, mostly white people on the string instruments but they could GROOVE),  James Brown (who sweated profusely but never slipped while he danced).  Aretha.  Stevie.  Everybody wanted to crash that party, even Elton John and David Bowie.  My sister Susan and I grew up standing in front of the set, shaking our respective “groove things” and putting our hands together until we learned some of the moves; Mom would take an occasional look and comment about the clothes: “I love the colors!!”  And, of course, the legendary “Soul Train” dance line was a part of every wedding, reunion, and bar mitzvah I’ve ever gone to.  Frankly, it’s not a party until you have a “Soul Train” dance line.  That’s just a fact. 

    This cultural phenom started small.  In 1970, a local Chicago DJ named Don Cornelius wrote, hosted, and produced a televised pilot version of his radio show with his own money (a whopping $400). Cornelius set the tone each week with his velvety voice and killer instinct for talent and trends.  The show was such a hit that the next year it relocated to Hollywood and was syndicated to stations across the country.  (And can we talk about the power of hearing the phrase ”..this has been a Don Cornelius Production“ at the end of every show?  This cool black dude with shades, a suit, and a ‘fro, owned the show! And that blew my mind!)  

    “Soul Train,” like that dancing choo-choo that opened the show each week, was the little engine that could.  It ran for a staggering 35 years, bringing African-American music and culture (and sometimes a little history lesson) into living rooms across the country and around the world. “Soul Train” was a democracy of dance.  And forty years later, at a time when the country seems so polarized, ”Soul Train” is a sweet reminder of how sharing a culture got us kids in sync, dancing to the same beat.  Thank you, Don Cornelius, for showing the world that black is beautiful, and that our music rocks the world. Now and forever, “we wish you love..peace..and SOUL!”

    Notes: 4 notes

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